participation or ownership.

Definitions from the New International Webster’s Student Dictionary
Our Philosophy on Community...
Community starts with family!
Strategic communications to our youth, adults, and elders
at home, school, work, and worship centers using internet and social
media.
Education, Community, Health, Economics, Spiritual Life, and  
Government, are the foundational underpinnings "Pillars" of
Civilization; and when fortified,  evolve for the betterment of
humankind.  

Education, from birth through life is free and accessible to as many
minds with the desire and dedication to learn.  
Community
becomes more connected as "each one teaches one".  
Health,
produced through education, nutritious foods, and exercise, is
vibrant; mentally, physically, and spiritually.  
Economics exploits
natural resources for optimum human development while
protecting the body, man and earth, from man-made contaminants
caused by synthetic productions.  
Spiritual Life enables each of us
to connect to the universe in our own way.  
Government is "We"
the "Will" of the people.

Lets start with the basic priorities:

  • Clean Air, Clean Water, and Clean Food
    Note:  The average human being can survive minutes without
    oxygen, 3 days without water and 7 days without food.
  • Responsible Eco-Shelters (geographic and climate
    considerations)
  • Planned Infrastructure
  • Agriculture (Regional with access to sufficient long-term
    water source for irrigation)
  • Communication (Targeted Communications)
  • Energy ("Green" energy)
  • Education (Free for life and Learn by Doing)
  • Health (Optimum, Maintain, Sustain)
  • Resources (Identify, Extract, Distribute)
  • *Technology (Facilitate infrastructure integration and
    connection to appropriate resources)
  • Transportation (Rail, Road, Water, and Air)

*Technology is the means by which work is streamlined.  
However, technology should not always be viewed as the
panacea for work productivity.  In some cases it may be more
advantageous to reduce/eliminate technology in lieu of
manual labor.  It may not be the most cost-effective method in
the short-term, but over the long-term may prove to be the
most productive.
 
Helpful~Recommended Links
Earth Saver Girl
Green For All
Teen Driver Safety Program (NJM)
UCI ~ I See You
Emergency Preparations/Supplies:
1. Work as a group/team:
2. Select the right clothing and essentials:
When it comes to clothing, wear things that are predominantly made of synthetic materials that keep you dry as you start to work
harder and sweat more. If you prefer to use pants (which is the most recommendable option), it should be made of durable, quick-
drying fabrics such as spandex or nylon; that way, your legs will be protected from some of the hazards, and will keep you warmer
when the temperature drops at night or in more extreme conditions.
Making sure that you have boots that are durable, comfortable, and appropriate for those kind of conditions (like waterproof
materials for example) is an absolute MUST! Remember that wearing the wrong boots or shoes could leave your feet aching and
give you serious injuries. It can be surprising just how many ligaments and muscles there are in our feet that are susceptible to
injury in the wrong shoes.
Something that can definitely help when leaning more towards hardcore trekking is a hiking stick or pole. When you use them,
your upper body shares part of the workload of hiking, which also provides exercise to your forearms, arms, shoulders, and chest
for a true whole-body workout.
To complement the clothing, there are some backpacking essentials that will keep you on the right path whatever the conditions:
Navigation (map and compass).
Sunglasses and sunscreen.
A headlamp or a flashlight.
First-aid kit or supplies (pills, bands, rubbing alcohol).
Hydration and nutrition.
There are statistics surrounding people getting lost without being fully prepared, so it’s always better to prepare for the worst
than just hoping for the best.
3. Know your destination:
Essential to your plans is researching and understanding location, the weather, and terrain before you leave; if you want to add
that extra layer of security, you should also invest in intermediate gear. Hiking and backpacking should be enjoyable, but you
should also be prepared and aware of everything.
As with many other sports and activities, hiking has different difficulty levels: The low difficulty can be a one-day hike on level
ground. A medium difficulty hike that might include spending a night camping, having some steep slopes, and carrying a more
loaded backpack. A high difficulty hike may require prior experience, as well as carrying a tent, sleeping bag, heater, high calorie
foods, and even being accompanied by an experienced guide.
You also need to remember that when you are out embracing nature, you should always ensure that you do as little as possible to
disturb the environment or ecosystem that you are sharing on your trip, and leave the location as you found it, something
championed by the Leave No Trace initiative.
When you plan your trip, check out the options for tours and guides, like Big Wild Adventures who offer Yellowstone backpacking
tours in an environment that is not to be taken for granted with its difficulty and danger, but also its natural beauty.

The important thing here is that you need to make this experience something exciting that invites you to come back and do it
again. There are a large number of trekking and hiking federations and groups who organize mountain activities and walks all
around the world. These activities are regulated by a series of safety standards, environmental protection rules, and
professionalism, and their goal is to let you enjoy your life plentifully discovering almost every place in the planet.

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/527829/3-useful-hiking-backpacking-tips

Shelter: Short-term
    1.        Tent (Biosphere)
Shelter: Long-term
    1.        Mountain Bunker
    2.        Cabin
    3.        Synthetic Bunker (i.e. Shipping container) (MPS protection)
Security/protection
    1.        Cameras
    2.        Motion Detectors
    3.        Guard Dogs
    4.        Firearms and sufficient ammunition
    a.        Hand-gun/ammunition (9mm)
    b.        Shot-gun/ammunition (12ga.)
    c.        Rife/ammunition (30/06)
    d.        Semi-auto/automatic firearm/ammunition
Food Supply:  Short-term
    1.        MRE (Meals Ready to Eat)
    2.        Canned/Bottled
    3.        Dry (Rice, Oatmeal, Beans, Peas, etc.)
    4.        Organic Air-loom Seeds (produce new seeds)
    5.        Variety of agricultural seeds
Food Supply:  Long-term
    1.        Grow Garden
    2.        Domestic Live-stock
    3.        Wild animals/game
Water Supply:  
    1.        Short-term/portable
    a.        Coconut water (Great source of hydration with key electrolytes)
    b.        Bottled water
    c.        Water purifier
    2.        Long-term/permanent
    a.        River/stream
Fuel:
    1.        Gasoline: (9mo3yr shelf-life)
    2.        Propane Gas
    3.        Kerosene Oil
    4.        55-Gallon Gas Storage
Medicine:
    1.        Potassium Iodine (Radiation protection)
    2.        Alcohol (medicine, long shelf life, bartering/trading)
    3.        
Primary and Alternative bugout Location:
    1.        'Bugout’ Plan
    a.        Practice 'Bugout' procedures to insure everyone is aware of their responsibilities in the event of an emergency
Communication Station
    1.        Communicate plans with family and friends.
    2.        Evacuation Plan
  1. Primary and Alternate escape routes (practice 2x/yr)
Transportation
    1.        Truck (4x4)
    2.        Rubber raft (6-8)
Tools
    1.        Generator (I prefer OHV as I personally experienced the need to repair a broken valve spring retainer during hurricane
    Sandy)
  1. Generators come in various sizes based on your power needs.  Basically, you will need to determine what appliances (e.
    g., refrigerator, freezer, radio, TV, phones, etc.).  We currently have a Generac generator with 5000w starting and 4000w
    sustained power output.  This generator has served our family well during both winter and summer power outages.  
    Many people don't think about outages in various seasons, but power needs for air conditioner(s) or heater(s) and the
    potential difference in power needs, should be considered. We recently purchased a Predator 8700/8550w as a backup,
    in the event the Generac fails, as it has recently started displaying issues running under load and we think it is because
    the replaced retainer ring is impacting the operation of the generator and we don't want to chance it in the event of an
    emergency.  I like Generac; however, the amount of power and the sale on the Predator model made a difficult decision
    to move away from Generac a little easier.
    2.        Chainsaw
    3.        

Supplies
    1.        Flashlights and Rechargeable Batteries
    2.        Emergency hand-powered radio
    3.        Matches and candles


Clarke Family Emergency Supplies:

•        Bin#1:
    o        Emergency/Disaster Binder and Maps (1)
    o        Large First-Aid Kit (1)
    o        Portable Range Stove (1)
    o        Portable Range Gas Fuel (2 cans)
    o        Small Canteen (1)
    o        Zip-Loc Bags (10) (small)
    o        Dust Masks (1 pk) (5/pk)
    o        Large Round Magnifying Glass (1) (4” diameter)
    o        Box of Stick Matches (1 box) (~50 matches)
    o        Heavy-Duty Zip-Loc Bag (1) (large – 2.25 gal)
    o        Fly Ribbon (1 pk) (3/pk)
    o        Shower Curtain (1) (Clear Plastic – 71” x 71”)
    o        * ‘C’ Batteries (2pks) (4/pk)

*  Items that need to be replaced or have expired.

Clarke Family Emergency Supplies:

•        Bin#2:
    o        Paper Plates (1 pk) (45 plates – 8.5in)
    o        Tea Spoons (1 pk) (50/pk)
    o        Paper Cups (1 pk) (50/pk – 9oz)
    o        Insulated Beverage Carrier (1) (20oz)
    o        Mini Water Bottle (1)
    o        Mixed Matches pks (10)
    o        Stainless Steel Trave Coffee Cup (1) (16oz)
    o        Space Light (1) (AA batteries)
    o        Zip Loc Bags (1pk) (10 small bags)
    o        Spice Rack (1) (variety of spices)
    o        Bottle of Canadian Wiskey (1) (40oz)
    o        Hefty  Zip-Loc Freezer Bags (1) (35 small 1qt bags)
    o        Bottle Opener (1)
    o        Portable Water Bottles (2)

*  Items that need to be replaced or have expired.

Clarke Family Emergency Supplies:

•        Bin#3:
    o        Portable Gas Range (1)
    o        *Portable Gas Range Fuel (4 cans)
    o        Zip-Loc Heavy-Duty Bag (2) (2.25 gal)
    o        Vicks Electric Medicine Steamer (1)
    o        *Vicks Vap Steamer Medicine (1) (8oz) (expired: May/07)
    o        Emergency Candles (1pk) (10/pk)
    o        Moth Balls (1pk)
    o        Ratchet Tie-Down (1) (15’ x 1”)
    o        Diaper Disposal Bag (1pk) (100/pk)
    o        Small Candles (1   2)
    o        Misty Mate Misting Pump (1)

*  Items that need to be replaced or have expired.

Clarke Family Emergency Supplies:

•        Bin#4:
    o        *Lever 2000 Bar Soap (7)
    o        Soap Storage Container (1)
    o        *Deodorant (1)
    o        *Hand Soap (1) (7.5oz)
    o        *Lysol Disinfectant Spray (1) (19oz)
    o        *Lysol Sanitizing Wipes (1 pk) (35/pk)
    o        Flashlight (2) (*“D” batteries)
    o        Headlight (1) (*“AA” batteries)
    o        ¾” Luggage Lock & Keys (2)
    o        Dettol Disinfectant (1) (35.25oz)
    o        Assorted Stretch Cords (1pk) (6/pk: 2 ~ 12”; 2 ~ 18”; 2 ~24”)
    o        Space Light (1) (*“AA” batteries)
    o        *Tension Headache Cooling Pads (2) (both previously opened)
    o        Zip-Loc Hefty Jumbo Storage Back (2) (2.5gal ea.)
    o        Insulated Bags (1pk) (3/pk: 1~lrg 20”x20”; 2~sm 12”x15”)
    o        Cleaning Sponges (6)
    o        Stainless Steel Thermos (1) (2qt)
    o        Specimen Packages (2)
    o        *Hand/Toe Warmers (3)
    o        *Hydrating Gel Soap Bar (1)
    o        Rubber Heating Pouches (2) (1~lrg; 2~sm)
    o        Zip-Loc Bags (3~XXL)
    o        Zip-Loc Bags (4~XL)
    o        Puff Facial Tissue (3 to-go pks w/12 tissues in ea pk)

•        Additional
    o        Coleman 8-Person Tent (1) (18’ x 10’)
    o        Blanket in knapsack (1)

*  Items that need to be replaced or have expired.
 
 
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Education
Developing an environment
for our children and
teachers that is conducive
to learning and teaching.
Community
Strengthening our
foundation by re-vitalizing
our family and community.
Health
Developing a program that
will provide education,
prevention, and curative
measures against dis-eases
impacting our community.
Economics
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independence through
investment in people,
information, and property.
Spiritual Life
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complex spiritual concepts.
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that support the priorities
of the people.